I'm Staying Lost

This is my small humble attempt to pay tribute to the experience that is "Lost." I'll ponder why I like it, WTF moments, go off on tangents, or just plain have fun! Come get lost with me!

Sunday, January 22, 2006

If an ego falls in the jungle, does it make a sound?

Well, well, well...Jack has flaws. Hey, that's OK. I hear most everyone does. And before you go off on Kate keep in mind she just might have saved everyone's hide. . . indirectly. Information Jack and the others may have been hoping for was probably not forthcoming anyway, and she probably kept the "hunting party" from making a big mistake in provoking the Others any further.

Anyways (ding), I had some other thoughts after this week and this is as good a place as any to dump them.

Redemption and other things

I think the question Charlie asked in S1 might be rephrased, "Guys, why are we (here)?" The smaller "why" --why the plane crashed--might be answered soon. I heard somewhere it may even be this season. It may have nothings to do with the larger why though -- the Losties' purpose for being there. Remember Mr. Eko's advice about not mistaking coincidence for fate? Even if the plane crash was just an accident, the situations the Losties find themselves in on the island would probably always be ties to what they need to work out--their issues, redemption--whatever you want to call it. Stressful situations tend to bring out the best and worst in everybody and all our buttons get pushed sooner or later!

What they did vs. What they think

Remember what Kate did? She killed her father. What did Jack do? Well, we learned this past week he lost a patient. He definitely felt responsible, even though others tried to tell him he did the best he could. I think in Jack's case, as with some of the other characters, it is not what he did that imprisons him--it's what he thinks he did. When Jack's wife told him he will always need something (someone) to fix, that was something she saw in Jack because deep down Jack believes it---and he believes it so strongly that it's become his curse, or his prison. It's what he needs to work out on the island.

Let's look at Hugo (Hurley). What did he do that was so terrible? Well, he won the lottery. Pretty cool, right? For most people, it would be. Once again, it's not so much what he did as what he thought. He thought he used cursed numbers to win, and that everything that happened to him as a result, and everyone associated with him, was bad. But are they really bad--or are they bad because he thinks they are? To him, those number represent drastic change and responsibility. One of his issues he needs to work out is how he handles that. And, once again, it's something he can control -- it's not fate.

What about Charlie? His big issue has to do with his drug addiction and how it affects those around him. But is it really the drugs or is it him? I think his larger issue is dependence on others -- the drugs just represent something he depends on. When he relied on others in the past, bad things happened. When he took the initiative -- went after Ethan to protect Claire, for instance -- she came back and was safe. Once again, he's in a prison of his own making. When he realizes that, I think he will conquer his addiction.

And Kate? Her issue stems not from what she did but what she thought. She takes risks (follows the hunting party into the jungle, goes down into the hatch first, etc.) and pushes people away because she thinks she can never be "good." As we have seen, this is a pretty subjective term. She didn't think she was bad because she killed her father -- she thinks she killed her father because she was bad. Maybe all she really needs to realize is that she is what she thinks she is.

This all seems to go back to what Locke has been preaching from Day 1, or soon after that. It's obvious that he struggles with this too. Not telling people what they can't do means they will have to figure it out for themselves, even if it gets them into trouble. It's what free will is all about. Maybe this is what is meant by "destiny." It might be everyone's destiny to figure out their own prisons, and that it is, for the most part, totally within their control to escape.

The "Others" - are they really evil?

This also ties in with Goodwin's comment about "good people" and why those who weren't considered good were not taken from the Tailies. I started thinking about who made this determination. As soon as I saw the "monster" scanning Eko, I though maybe it was based on what the person thought they were as much as what moments in their lives may have shown. Thoughts have power. This is probably what makes Walt so special, as Zeke has said.

This brings me at last to Zeke and his group. The big question now is -- are they really the enemy? The Losties -- at times -- seem to be their own worst enemy. But Jack thinks Zeke and his group are certainly at least capable of harming them. But this is ties to his world view that this situation can be "fixed" by training an army. There will surely be disagreement on how to do this and what the "army" will be used for, and this will likely take us to the end of this season and probably beyond. It is also another device to show us things are generally what we think they are -- if we think every stranger is an enemy, we will raise an army to deal with them. If we think revenge will satisfy us, it will. If we think a group of numbers is cursed, they will be. If we think drugs have a hold on us, they do. And if we think there is a horse in the jungle and we touch it, it's really there. Why the Losties are there may just be a coincidence -- but it just might be their destiny to figure out their real deserted islands are of their own making.